Boston Red Sox

Boston Red Sox

Friday, June 23, 2017

David Ortiz Earned the Retirement of No. 34



The Boston Red Sox will retire David Ortiz’s No. 34 in a pregame ceremony tonight, making him just the 10th Red Sox player to receive the honor.

Big Papi joins Wade Boggs, Joe Cronin, Bobby Doerr, Carlton Fisk, Pedro Martinez, Johnny Pesky, Jim Rice, Ted Williams and Carl Yastrzemski as Red Sox icons who have earned this distinction. However, Ortiz will become the first Red Sox player to have his number retired within a year of his final game.

Ortiz’s place in Red Sox history, and in major league history, is cemented.

A 10-time All Star over his 14 years in Boston, Ortiz was instrumental in the Red Sox' 2004, 2007 and 2013 World Series titles, coming through with huge clutch hits that propelled the team to each of those championships. In fact, Ortiz was the MVP of the 2013 World Series.

Ortiz famously holds the Red Sox single-season record for home runs with 54, which he set during the 2006 season.

He is also in the top five in most offensive categories on the Red Sox' all-time list. For example, only Williams hit more homers (521) for the Red Sox than the 483 belted by Ortiz. And Ortiz ranks third in RBI, behind only Williams and Yastrzemski.

Ortiz had 10 100-RBI seasons with Boston, passing Williams for the most in franchise history. He joined Babe Ruth, Albert Pujols, Hank Aaron and Lou Gehrig as the only players with 10 or more seasons of at least 30 homers and 100 RBI for a single team.

Yes, Ortiz is more than just an all-time Red Sox great; he proved himself to be one of the game’s all time greats.

Consider this: throughout the game’s history, more than 15,000 men have taken the field as Major League Baseball players.

Ortiz finished his illustrious career ranked:

8th in extra-base hits (tied with Ken Griffey Jr.)
10th in doubles
17th in home runs
22nd in RBI
24th in slugging
30th in OPS
31st in total bases
40th in walks

Those achievements, against the background of 15,000 historical players, put his remarkable career in perspective.

Big Papi was great over a sustained period and was a premier player right until the very end. He concluded his career by having the greatest season for any 40-year-old in baseball history, and his most productive since 2012. Ortiz established single-season records for players over the age of 40 in home runs, RBI, doubles and extra-base hits. In fact, he recorded the most home runs and RBI by any player in his final season, and many of the game’s great players retired earlier than age 40.

No, Ortiz didn’t go out with a whimper, as so many aging athletes do. Instead, he went out with a bang. In 151 games, the Sox legend slashed .315/.401/.620 with 38 homers and 127 RBI, which was tied for first in the AL. Ortiz also led all players with a .620 slugging percentage, a 1.021 OPS and 48 doubles.

His 38 homers – which included 16 of the go-ahead variety – and 127 RBI were his best totals since 2006.

For those exploits, Ortiz earned another Silver Slugger award last season, an honor that goes to the top hitter at each position in his respective league. It was the seventh Silver Slugger for Ortiz, the most by any DH in history.

Ortiz also won the Hank Aaron Award for the American League, given to the best offensive performer in each league. It was the second time Ortiz won the award, previously collecting the prize in 2005.

However, Papi's greatness may never have been more evident than this year, when he hasn’t played a single game.

With Ortiz at the helm, the Red Sox led the Majors in runs scored last year. This season, Boston ranks 17th in runs and 27th in home runs.

The Red Sox biggest challenge this season has been attempting to replace Ortiz’s offensive impact. Pitchers feared and respected Ortiz. Last year, he walked 80 times, leading to his stellar .401 on-base percentage. Who in the current lineup do pitchers truly fear?

As the Red Sox have discovered, there is no replacing David Ortiz. From his personality and charm off the field, to his presence in the clubhouse and dugout, Ortiz has left some very big shoes to fill.

Tonight, the Red Sox and their fans will say a hearty "Thank You" to Big Papi for the three championships and all the great memories through the years.

It's a chance for all of us to say, "We salute you, David!"

Sunday, May 21, 2017

Drew Pomeranz is a Bust for the Red Sox



It's time to admit that Drew Pomeranz is a bust for the Red Sox.

The lefty has yet to get past six innings this season. Moreover, in his last three outings, Pomeranz hasn’t lasted more than four innings.

It’s part of an ongoing pattern. Since joining the Red Sox last July, he has gotten an out in the seventh inning just twice in 21 starts.

This season, Pomeranz is 3-3 with a 4.97 ERA and a 1.47 WHIP through eight starts. But the evidence of his failure to perform stretches back to last season, when Pomeranz went 3-5, with a 4.59 ERA and a 1.37 WHIP over 68.2 innings, for the Red Sox.

It will never be forgotten (and perhaps never forgiven) that the Red Sox surrendered their top pitching prospect, Anderson Espinoza, for Pomeranz. It was a steep price and one that has already proven to be far too costly.

Perhaps the failure of Pomeranz, who was an All Star last season with San Diego, is attributable to a bad left elbow, which the Padres were fully aware of prior to the trade.

San Diego withheld medical information about Pomeranz’s elbow from the Red Sox before the trade, which eventually became public knowledge.

Consequently, on September 16, 2016, Padres general manager A. J. Preller was suspended for 30 days for keeping two sets of medical records for players - one internal and one for league use.

The Red Sox worst fears may be materializing. Pomeranz, who received a stem cell injection in his left elbow during the offseason, began this season on the 10-day disabled list due to a left triceps ailment. Then he was recently pulled from a game after complaining about left triceps soreness.

Whatever the reason, the Red Sox can’t trust Pomeranz when he takes the mound. He puts too much pressure on the bullpen because he can’t get past the sixth inning, or sometimes even the fourth.

With an ERA approaching 5.00, Pomeranz barely qualifies for fifth-starter status in Boston, a high-payroll team with very clear playoff expectations.

No one should be surprised if Pomeranz’s season is derailed by his elbow troubles, and surgery remains a possibility, if not a likely outcome.

The Red Sox were given the chance to rescind the trade last season, when Preller’s devious dealing was revealed. But the Red Sox, who were in the playoff hunt, declined the offer since the trade deadline had already passed, leaving them with no other options. Boston just crossed its fingers and hoped for the best.

At this point, Dave Dombrowski and company would certainly like a do-over.

Friday, May 12, 2017

Mitch Moreland Could Join an Elite List of Red Sox This Season



With 15 doubles as of Friday, Mitch Moreland is on track for at least 50 doubles this season, something that has only been accomplished by seven players in Red Sox history.

Incredibly, the club record for doubles in a single season is also the Major League record. Red Sox outfielder Earl Webb hit an astounding 67 two-baggers in 1931. Webb posted freakish output that season, as his next highest total was a mere 30 doubles.

Here’s the list of Red Sox players who’ve hit 50 or more doubles in a season. It's quite short and reads like a who’s who list of Sox greats:

Earl Webb - 67 (1931) (MLB Record)
Nomar Garciaparra - 56 (2002)
Tris Speaker - 53 (1912)
David Ortiz - 52 (2007)
Nomar Garciaparra - 51 (2000)
Wade Boggs - 51 (1989)
Joe Cronin - 51 (1938)
Dustin Pedroia - 54 (2008)

Fourteen different Red Sox have led the American League in doubles, with several multiple-time winners. Carl Yastrzemski captured the doubles title three times and holds the team career record of 645 – well ahead of the 525 registered by Ted Williams. Williams twice led the AL in doubles with back-to-back titles in 1948 and 1949.

The gap between Sox players who've hit 40 doubles in a season and those who've hit at least 50 is canyon-like.

A Red Sox player has hit at least 40 doubles in a season just 24 times in the club’s lengthy history. The list includes Hall of Famers like Ted Williams, Carl Yastrzemski, Tris Speaker and Wade Boggs, as well fan favorites like Johnny Pesky, Fred Lynn, Nomar Garciaparra, David Ortiz, Dustin Pedroia and Mookie Betts.

But there are some modern Sox players on that list that might surprise some: John Valentin hit 47 doubles in 1997, Bill Buckner hit 46 in 1985, Bill Mueller hit 45 in 2003, Jody Reed hit 45 in 1990 and Jarrod Saltalamacchia hit 40 doubles in 2013 ( a club record for catchers).

Some Red Sox players made the achievement a habit. Wade Boggs leads the list, notching at least 40 doubles an amazing 8 times. Ortiz reached the mark five times. Nomar Garciaparra did it 4 times. Williams, Yastrzemski, Valentin and Pedroia each hit the mark 3 times. Meanwhile, Tris Speaker, Joe Cronin, Eddie Bressoud, Fred Lynn, Jody Reed, David Ortiz and Mookie Betts all hit at least 40 doubles twice.

Should Moreland maintain his current pace, he would join a rather illustrious group. Though it may be too early in the season to make such a projection, he certainly has a good shot at hitting 45 — a number that has been reached by a Sox player just 24 times in the club’s 117-year history.

That, in itself, would be quite an impressive achievement.

Saturday, May 06, 2017

Power Outage in Boston; Where has the Red Sox Offense Gone?


Xander Bogaerts exemplifies the Red Sox tired, lackluster offense this season

More than a month into the 2017 season, the Red Sox are 15-14 and in third place in the AL East, four games behind New York and a half-game behind Baltimore. This is the same team that was the preseason favorite to win the AL Pennant. The good news is that they remain a game above .500.

Yet, the Sox have lost six of their last 10 games and are not trending in the right direction.

The starting rotation has mostly kept Boston competitive and in games. Chris Sale has a 1.38 ERA; Eduardo Rodriguez has a 3.07 ERA; Drew Pomeranz has a 4.00 ERA; and Rick Porcello has a 4.48 ERA, which should get better; right?

Boston this week lost knuckleballer Steven Wright to season-ending knee surgery, which could be a big blow given that he went 13-6 with a 3.33 ERA and was an All-Star last year. The righty got off to a rough start this season, going 1-3 with an 8.25 ERA, but that was likely attributable to his knee injury, which began in spring training.

However, David Price has yet to throw a pitch this season and his presence will surely help to stabilize and improve this rotation.

Boston’s starters have a cumulative 4.18 ERA, which is 14th in the majors and 9th in the American League. No matter how you slice it, they’re middle of the pack, which is more than can be said for the Sox’ offense.

The Red Sox have topped four runs only four times in their last 15 games. Even worse, they have scored three runs or less in 12 of 29 games this season.

Boston is 27th in the majors (out of 30 teams), with just 110 runs scored. Unless your rotation and bullpen are consistently outstanding, it’s very difficult to maintain a winning record in that environment. Yet, the Sox have done it, albeit by just a single game.

The problem is attributable to a total power outage; the Red Sox have totaled just 19 home runs this season. Yankee phenom Aaron Judge has 13 all by himself. This is not the hallmark of a classic Red Sox team, which has been built on slugging for many decades.

Not a single Red Sox player is slugging as high as .500 this year. In fact, Christian Vazquez leads the club with a .467 slugging percentage. Yet, the Boston catcher has just four doubles, 1 triple and no home runs. Yeah, it’s that bad.

Guys who were expected to carry the Sox’ lineup and be run producers just aren’t getting the job done. Consider the following:

- Mookie Betts is slugging .420 with 13 RBI (he was runner up for the MVP last season)
- Pablo Sandoval is slugging .377 with 10 RBI (Sandoval is currently on the DL due to a knee sprain)
- Xander Bogaerts is slugging .370 with 6 RBI
- Dustin Pedroia is slugging .330 with 8 RBI
- Sandy Leon is slugging .286 with 6 RBI
- Jackie Bradley is slugging .263 with 6 RBI

That’s the bulk of the lineup and they’re not getting it done. It’s not enough production to win very many baseball games, making it all the more amazing that the Red Sox still have a winning record at this point.

The best this team and its fans can hope is that as the weather starts heating up, so does the offense. We’ve been hoping that for weeks, however.

Help is not on the way. Minor leaguers Sam Travis or Rafael Devers will not rescue this offense. Beyond, those two, most of the organization’s upper echelon of prospects has been traded away in recent years to obtain players such as Craig Kimbrel and Drew Pomeranz.

The trade deadline is still nearly three months away and ownership is determined to stay under the luxury tax threshold anyway. In other words, some big-time slugger won’t be arriving in Boston this summer to spark the offense. The players on the current roster will have to figure it out themselves. They need to be better and perform to their potential.

It should not be forgotten that the Red Sox had the best offense in baseball last year, leading the majors in runs, hits, doubles, total bases, RBI, batting average, OBP, slugging and OPS. That’s nearly every single statistical category. Yes, the Red Sox' offense was a juggernaut in 2016.

The only notable absence from last year’s roster is David Ortiz and though he was a world-class slugger, he was not the entire offense. It’s as if much of the lineup decided to retire their bats along with Ortiz's.

Hitting is said to be contagious, for better and for worse. If a couple of the above hitters can get going, it could have a broader impact, sparking the whole lineup.

It needs to happen sooner than later. This is the time of the year when teams want to pad their record with wins, before the grind of the 162-game schedule begins to take its toll in the season’s later months, in the form of fatigue and injuries.

One thing is for sure: we haven’t yet seen the best this Red Sox team has to offer. They’re surely better than this.

Wednesday, April 05, 2017

Early Returns on Red Sox 2013 Draft Not Looking Good



Lefty Trey Ball was selected by the Red Sox in the first round of the 2013 draft. Boston later selected righty Teddy Stankiewicz in the second round. The Sox had high hopes for both.

However, the pitchers are now ranked as the 29th and 25th best prospects, respectively, in the Red Sox system. With three-plus years of minor league experience under their belts, that's likely not what the Sox were expecting from the them at this point.

At 6'6" and 190 pounds, the 22-year-old Ball is a lanky left-hander with a thin frame, who scouts say "needs to fill out and add strength." However, they also says he "has great athleticism and is very projectable."

Though Ball has "middle of the rotation potential," according to his scouting report, he is "extremely raw, particularly for someone drafted so early and has a long way to go to reach that potential."

At 6'4" and 215 pounds, the 23-year-old Stankiewicz possesses a "solid pitcher's build with room for growth," since he is "on the thin side at present," reads the scouting report.

The expectations for Stankiewicz have clearly dropped in recent years. About him, the scouting report reads:

"Potential to be an emergency spot starter or long relief type. If command doesn’t improve and secondary pitches don’t develop, will have to move to the bullpen. Lacks an above-average offering, which limits upside."

The scouting report seems to indicate that Ball has the greater upside of the two, yet the former first rounder is ranked as only the 29th best prospect in the Red Sox system. That's not encouraging.

The status of these two pitchers reveals why scouting, drafting and development are so critical. The Sox may have essentially wasted the first two picks in the 2013 draft on pitchers who don't seem to have a lot of upside or major league potential.

At this point, both seem to be a long way from the big leagues.

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

What to Expect from the 2017 Red Sox



The Red Sox will open the 2017 season on Monday and the expectations are high for this group.

What exactly should we expect? Are the Sox the best team in the highly competitive AL East, meaning they will win the division? Are they, at the least, a playoff team? According to many experts, the answers are yes.

ESPN projects that Boston will claim the AL East title, winning 93 games, as do USA Today (94 wins) the St. Louis Dispatch (90 wins), Bleacher Report (91 wins) and the Arizona Republic.

The 2016 Red Sox claimed the AL East title by winning 93 games, yet were swept by Cleveland in the ALDS.

The biggest changes to this year’s team are the retirement of David Ortiz and the addition of Chris Sale. While the loss of Ortiz could make the offense weaker, the addition of Sale should make the rotation/defense stronger.

The Red Sox had the best offense in baseball last year, leading the majors in runs, hits, doubles, total bases, RBI, batting average, OBP, slugging and OPS. That’s nearly every single statistical category. Yes, the Red Sox' offense was a juggernaut in 2016.

While Ortiz was a key cog in that prolific machine, he was not the entire offense. In fact, Mookie Betts was runner up for the MVP Award, with nearly identical stats to winner Mike Trout. Ortiz aside, the rest of that high-powered offense returns in 2017, with the addition of first baseman Mitch Moreland.

For what it’s worth, Red Sox’ stats guru Bill James projects Moreland will produce the following numbers this season: 20 homers, 65 RBIs, 52 runs, .246 batting average, .310 on-base percentage, .431 slugging percentage, .741 OPS.

Though he has eclipsed the 20-homer plateau in three of the last four seasons, Moreland is actually a defensive specialist, having won the AL Gold Glove at first base with Texas last season. Any offensive boost he provides the Sox would be a bonus.

Boston will also benefit from a full season of Andrew Benintendi, who played in just 34 games for the Sox last year.

James makes the following projection for Benintendi this season: 38 doubles, 5 triples, 12 home runs, 73 RBI, 87 runs, .290 batting average, .352 OBP, .443 slugging, .794 OPS, 21 steals.

If James is accurate, or even close, with his projections for Moreland and Benintendi, the Red Sox offense should withstand the loss of Ortiz and be highly potent again this year.

Then we get to the Red Sox rotation, which, on paper at least, may be the best in baseball. Boston will feature 2016 Cy Young Award winner Rick Porcello and 2012 Cy Young winner, David Price, who will start the season on the disabled list. The addition of Chris Sale likely makes the Red Sox’ front three the most formidable in baseball.

James makes the following projection for Sale: 33 starts, 231 innings, 16-10 record, 3.04 ERA, 195 hits, 24 homers, 47 walks, 259 strikeouts.

Price posted a solid 17-9 record last season, but had a disappointing 3.99 ERA in 35 starts. The lefty led the majors with 230 innings pitched, but also gave up a league-leading 227 hits.

James envisions a bounce-back season for Price in 2017: 33 starts, 16-10 record, 3.22 ERA, 229 innings, 222 strikeouts, 48 walks, 23 homers, 211 hits

It should not be overlooked that both Steven Wright and Drew Pomeranz were All Stars last season. What other team has All Stars in both the No. 4 and No. 5 rotation slots? None.

James makes the following projections for the Red Sox' fourth and fifth starters, as well as Eduardo Rodriguez, who will fill in for Price until he is healthy and who could replace another injured starter this season:

Wright: 30 starts, 198 innings, 11-11 record, 3.91 ERA, 152 strikeouts, 70 walks, 20 homers, 195 hits.

Pomeranz: 31 starts, 177 innings, 11-9 record, 3.92 ERA, 170 strikeouts, 67 walks, 21 homers, 163 hits.

Rodriguez: 31 starts, 172 innings, 10-9 record, 3.87 ERA, 148 strikeouts, 53 walks, 20 homers, 171 hits.

As is always the case, health will be the ultimate determinant to the Red Sox success this season. If Price’s elbow continues to be problematic, that would be equally problematic to the Red Sox' ambitions this season.

In the same way, the loss of a player such as Dustin Pedroia, Xander Bogaerts, Mookie Betts or Jackie Bradley could also derail the Sox’ hopes and dreams.

If Boston’s key players remain mostly healthy this season and do not miss significant time, this club is clearly capable of winning the American League Pennant and even the World Series.

One thing is for sure, this team will be fun to watch, and 2017 should be a very exciting and eventful season for the Red Sox.

Let the games begin!